When Is Alarmist Brewing Going To Open?

In this artists rendering, the City of Chicago will look much like this by the time Alarmist is operational. Fortunately by then we'll be able to transport beer directly to customers via the "Ionic-Suds-O-Particleizer 3000".

In this artists rendering, the City of Chicago will look much like this by the time Alarmist is operational. Fortunately by then we'll be able to transport beer directly to customers via the "Ionic-Suds-O-Particleizer 3000".

Ahhh, the eternal question. Second most popular question we get after "Where is the brewery going to be located?" and "Do I have to call the police on you again?". I've been blogging this journey since October 11, 2011. You would think this thing would be up and running right? I remember back when I first started thinking about opening a brewery. I foolishly assumed that the entire process would take a year. Youth is wasted on the young.

Here's the deal. Nate and I have been presented with an awesome opportunity that will make this journey a lot easier and cheaper. We can't divulge all the details yet as there are many things that need to happen to make it come to fruition. It will no doubt add a few extra months to our timeline, but it will be totally worth it, trust me. We're calling this new development "Plan A". We spent hours coming up with that name. Nate initially wanted to call it "A Plan" but I pointed out that he was stupid and he agreed. Our original plan is now entitled "Plan B". Nate also wanted to call that plan "A Plan". Again I pointed out his stupidity and then he parried with "Plan B". Touché Nathan Barth, touché. We will one day do battle again and you will not be let off so easily.

Regardless of which plan ends up working out for us, and one of them definitely will, we won't be opening doors until early 2014.

The reasons for this timeline are quite simple: new equipment requires at least 6 months to be manufactured and delivered, business loans require 2-3 months of processing and analysis (especially SBA ones, according to our sources). We can't buy the equipment until we have secured the loan. Then there are construction timelines, but those in theory would run in parallel with the equipment manufacturing. Oh and the leasing process. That takes some time as well. And then there are some other events that need to occur prior to all of these, adding some extra months as I mentioned previously.

Nate and I have really started to get the loan process figured out and we've begun to reach out to all the potential investors who've contacted us over the past 18 months or so. So all the financing stuff, the most important part of this process, is really starting to come together. Our ability to get a loan looks fantastic and it appears we won't have much trouble getting enough investors on board.

I can tell you that between now and opening day, we will be very, very busy. There are so many things we need to do and there will be very, very few lulls during the run up to opening day. We have to update our branding, figure out package design, finish our recipe formulations and trials, conduct investor meetings, legal documents need finalizing (including partnership stuff which is new to the game), planning our hop contracts, the list goes on.

Nate is as big of a fan of having one's ducks in a row as I am and we are both ruthlessly researching numerous aspects of opening a small business. I can tell you that once we are open, we will have rock solid legal and financial foundations so that we can immediately get to the task of what this is all about: making great beer and getting it to customers.

Cheers,

G